the Municipality
Cilavegna
Is about 46 Km from Pavia

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The History
Cilavegna was once owned by the Bishop of Pavia who was granted the privilege and permission by King Berengar I to build a castle in 911. The village was politically subjugated and annexed to the community of Pavia in 1164 by Frederick I, sur-named Barbarossa. It was mentioned in 1250 as Cellavegna on the list of lands within the territory of Pavia. In the following century it fell under the domain of the Beccaria family and, in 1412, was one of the villages assigned to Castellino Beccaria, the Count of Voghera. It subsequently became the property of the Maletti family (in 1466) and later on of Vercellino Visconti (in 1483) who had family ties with the Beccaria family on his wife’s side (she was the sister of the Count of Gambolò). The ownership was later transferred to the Antellani family and, in 1636, to the Counts of Landriano, the Taverna family, until feudalism was eventually abolished in 1797. Places of interest: • 10th century Tower • Church of San Martino • Church of SANT’ANTONIO • Church of Santissimi Pietro e Paolo • Church of Santa Maria • St. Anna’s Sanctuary
2690

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Luoghi da Visitare
  • • Torre del sec.X
  • • Chiesa di S. Martino
  • • Chiesa di S. ANTONIO
  • • Chiesa dei SS. Pietro e Paolo
  • • Chiesa di S. Maria
  • • Santuario di S. Anna
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The History
Cilavegna was once owned by the Bishop of Pavia who was granted the privilege and permission by King Berengar I to build a castle in 911. The village was politically subjugated and annexed to the community of Pavia in 1164 by Frederick I, sur-named Barbarossa. It was mentioned in 1250 as Cellavegna on the list of lands within the territory of Pavia. In the following century it fell under the domain of the Beccaria family and, in 1412, was one of the villages assigned to Castellino Beccaria, the Count of Voghera. It subsequently became the property of the Maletti family (in 1466) and later on of Vercellino Visconti (in 1483) who had family ties with the Beccaria family on his wife’s side (she was the sister of the Count of Gambolò). The ownership was later transferred to the Antellani family and, in 1636, to the Counts of Landriano, the Taverna family, until feudalism was eventually abolished in 1797. Places of interest: • 10th century Tower • Church of San Martino • Church of SANT’ANTONIO • Church of Santissimi Pietro e Paolo • Church of Santa Maria • St. Anna’s Sanctuary
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